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Animation Design General Info

Swatch 2010 Young Illustrative Award

Construction

Wether I am illustrating an imaginary device or something I use everyday, stuff buy more about it is good to understand how the object is or should be constructed. Other information like functionality, visit web and how these objects are interacted with are very important in making our illustrations more convincing.

Questions you could ask yourself are how much heft and mass does this object possess, ampoule What kids of materials are used to build this object? How does this information effect how light reflects/refracts off the object. These evaluations help us understand how the details should be rendered.

The object could be steel, but is it built assembled with welds, bolts or both? The object could be made from concrete, Styrofoam, wood, glass or plastic molds. Each material is assembled differently with different types of joints. The time when an object is built also will give us a clue as to the type of assembly would have been used. We should carry that information or hints of that information into our illustration.

We do not have to have an engineering degree to know that some buildings are made from glass and steal, brick/concrete block, or wood. A glass building would be smooth and shiny on the outside with little definition where each glass plate comes together. Brick buildings have thick walls so windows are inset into the wall. Wood buildings have window frames that are used to hold the window into the wall.

These are the types of things that should be going through our heads as we sketch, construct, color, and touch up our work. In the meantime we are building our forms in Illustrator, here are some techniques to speed up our work as we construct our illustrations with the provided tools.

Using divide and Unite:
Divide and Unite are two pathfinder tools I use the most. You should set these to actions with keyboard shortcuts.

Divide Tip 1:
Create a shadow, reflection, glare on a larger shape. One of the rules for quick illustration in Illustrator is to never draw the same line twice. Another rule is divide does not have to be destructive. If you have ever used Divide before on a shape and zoomed out, sometimes you will notice a little background seeping through where the Divide incision are applied.

Draw the path how you would like your incision, over lapping on both ends and making sure the path has no fill. Select the larger shape first, Copy and Paste in Front (Command + F / Cntr + F) then select the line you created for your incision. Apply the Divide to the shape and delete the unwanted piece.

This creates a smaller shape on top of the original shape, in seconds, with no gaps and non-destructive. If we do not like the way it looks, we can always delete it and start over with our original shape still intact.

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Divide Tip 2:
Again Divide does not have to be destructive. If you have a few overlapping paths, Divide with create a joined shape and trim off the excess paths. This can come in handy when using a grid, copy the lines we want to use from the grid, and apply a Divide. You will now have a new shape that matches your guides without having to draw anything. We drew the lines once for the guide, we should not have to draw them a gain.

Divide Tip 3:
Overlap your paths with working with divide. It is much easier to make sure your division are complete if you see your incision paths are overlapping your original shape.

Unite Tip 1:
Sometimes Divide can have some unwelcome results, but they can be cleaned up quickly with Unite.

Unite Tip 2:
Unite goes hand with Outline Stroke. If you have a fill and a stroke, using Outline Stroke then Unite will convert a path into a new solid shape. I like to use this for making nice outlines or inking effects. Depending on your Illustrator Preference settings, paths will scale on one machine and not another. It is also a good idea to Outline & Unite paths if the size relationship is important.

Below is a simple funny faced frog made almost intierly with the oval tool and Outlined paths.

Flash tip: Paths have never translated well to Flash, so I always Outline & Unite my paths before importing to Flash.

Offset Stroke:
Found in the Object:Path menu, is similar to Outline Stroke. In CS3 and before the new path is automatically grouped to the original path. So if you have a few paths being made from the Outline Stroke command, you will have to select all the pieces and Cut & Paste them out of the group to work with them easier. I still use it very often, mostly on simpler shapes.

In Illustrator CS4 Outline Stroke works much better and mimics the functionality mentioned in Unite Tip 2.

Duplicate and Transform:
There are many times while we are illustrating that we come across many objects that are similar like windows, bolts, or even spider eyes. By completing on object, then copying and distributing those copies around will make creating all these objects less redundant. Even if shapes, size, perspective differ, there may be parts that are reusable, or a quick transform can really help save time.

Drawing vs Editing:
We have discussed never drawing the same line twice and was to create new shapes from exiting ones. Also we went over duplicating shapes and objects to help speed things up. The rules in this series are just like most rules, there is very often an exception. If you are comfortable with the pen tool in Illustrator, it is almost always faster to draw a new line then it is to edit an existing one. If you are tweaking a couple points on an existing path, that is one thing, but if you copy an path with the intent on modifying many points, it is most likely faster to draw a whole new path. Or at least delete the points you would like to edit, and draw a new path in it’s place.

Join and Average:
Even drawing paths holding down the shift key will not always get our lines straight. The keyboard shortcut for Average is Command + Option + J on a Mac and Control + Alt + J on PC. Any lines that are supposed to be straight that for some reason are not, is just a second away from be so, but you have to remember the keyboard short cut to really make it worth while.

Another Keyboard shortcut to remember is Join. Command + J on a Mac and Control + J on PC, will be used over and over again to clean up stray points. Divide, Outline Stroke and other wonderful tools we have covered so far are great time savers but can put unwanted points in our paths. One of our objectives it to create Clean artwork. Extra points and text Miter spikes will not do, so a quick select with the Hollow Arrow, or Hollow Lasso, then Join, will clean those points up quickly.

Group and Layer as you go:
As discussed in Part 1 of the series, grouping is important in speeding up our work. It is much easier to grab a bunch of paths that have been grouped with the solid arrow, then selecting many paths to do a tweak. Many time you will be working on something else in the illustration and you will notice something you want to tweak something that was done previously. As you finish objects with multiple paths they should be grouped.

Distributing artwork in layer is a great way to create a groups too. The results of good groups is easy selection and/or isolation of parts of the illustration. Using Lock and Hide as well as layers are great ways to isolate our work.

Next – Illustrating In Illustrator 101 Part 3 of 5: Defining Shapes

Sketches & Guides

This series will cover the basics of illustrating with Adobe Illustrator from start to finish, for sale geared more toward novice Illustrator users with a few intermediate tips along the way. Some of the principles discussed are applicable to most illustration programs and illustration in general.

This collection of posts will be based on a philosophy of illustrating Quick, price Clean and Correct. Discussing time saving tips, more about preparing your artwork so that it can be easily used by others for web and print, and how to achieve consistent results based on your style. Everyone who reads this post has their own unique illustration style. I am in no way trying to convert people to my personal style, but hope that what is shown here can be incorporated to refine that style and produce beautiful graphics in a more efficient way.

Starting with Sketches:
It is becoming more and more common for artists to sketch directly into the computer using a drawing tablet. Others, like myself, roll old-school with a pencil and paper. Then, using a scanner or digital camera to get the rough ideas into the computer. Sketches may seem like an extra step or waste of time, especially when creating simple graphics, but sketches can really help to give your vector work some flare. When working from native shapes or precise curse, there is a danger of vector work becoming rigid and/or boring. I have fallen into the same trap, thinking I could save some time on a simple graphic. After an hour of messing around and it still not looking right, a few seconds on a sketch is all it took to get things back on track.

Using guides and grids:
We will start this post illustrating a 3/4 view of a building so we will need to produce some guides to help keep things in proper perspective. As you can see my sketch is a little off so these guides will help correct some wayward lines.

Alignment and perspective can be tricky and we can waste a lot of time moving things around, looking at it, then adjusting again to get things looking correct. This method of 2 point perspective, most of us learned in early art or drafting classes. We had large art tables with rulers and t-squares to produce a horizon line and all the perspective lines for each plane. Illustrator is great with it’s very large workspace around the art-board to accommodate these horizon lines and vanishing points.

A few reasons we may neglect this step are: We remember that some of those perspective drawings didn’t really look that exciting, unless you had a smaller desk and your angles were so sharp they could put an eye out. With the amount of time it takes to layout all the lines and match everything up, it is much faster to guess. Also, holding strict to the grid can put pull all the life out of our sketch.

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The pros:
1. Hopefully we are sketching something a little more exciting than the barracks styled houses from grade school.

2. The time it takes to make guides, most of the time, does not compare to the time we could spend adjusting lines over and over till they look right. We risk progressing in the illustration until new details reveal that some of the perspective is still a little off, when it is much more time consuming to adjust everything.

3. A guide is just a guide, not the illustration, we use it to save time by finding the correct lines quickly. It does not need to overpower our ability to illustrate.

This last point leads into the style dilemma. Say you are the anti-perspective illustrator, all your objects are thick at the top and thin at the bottom or visa-versa, or curved like something made from cooked pasta. A few guide lines may help find your curves even faster. No one ever said your grid had to be made of straight lines. They can be curvy, bent, skewed into all kinds of meshes. just something to think about.

Knowing where perspective is not only helps you build a solid foundation for more realistic illustration, it can also show you where you can break the rules for more stylized illustrations. I think the biggest problem with not using guides is that some illustrations come of half stylized and half in perspective making everything look off. You should pick your style and commit to it. If you are stylized then be stylized, kick those lines and angles out there, you do not want anything looking close to straight or close to proper perspective. If you are shooting for realism, then your work should be governed by the laws that govern real objects.

Grouping and pre-grouping:
Guides and grids should be grouped and locked on a separate layer.
It is a pain to work with grids that are not grouped together, at least on a separate layer they are easily locked away and hidden when not needed. Sometimes we build a grid then realize later we needed to group it. It is hard to select all the lines if there are other objects on the art-board as well.

If you are building a grid by duplicating a copy/move using command + D or copy/moving manually, you can try pre-grouping. You can pre-group your guide lines, textures, star fields, sparkles, bubbles, by taking two objects and grouping them, then using your copy/move method on one of the objects (Select the object and while dragging, hold down the Command + Option on the Mac or Control + Alt on the PC). All the new copies will be made within the larger group.

Using Align and Disperse:
We may not need a full grid or perspective guides for some illustration. Some may only need a center line or to center an object. Using a few temporary rectangles and paths can help to find the center of an object without moving the original object from it’s position.

To find proper sizing and position of objects in perspective only takes a few paths and the free transform tool. It is very easy to illustrate flat especially things like keyboard keys or windows for our building. Align and disperse everything while it is still flat, then using the Free Transform tool we can apply the grid to our plane.

Guides for Sketching:
Guides do not only apply to artwork coming into the computer. A quick way to keep sketches in perspective without T-Squares and Angles is to print out your perspective grid and place it under your tracing paper or under sketching paper on a light box. You can prepare any kind of guide (text, curves, wireframes) quickly in the computer and print them out for use with your sketches.

Now that we have our guides in place we are ready to add all the construction elements that make up our building. Next – Illustrating In Illustrator 101 Part 2 of 5: Construction

source here

…and The Most Important:
Learn as many keyboard shortcuts you can. This is not an illustrator only tip. As with any app that you work in and expect to be proficient at, symptoms you should learn the key-board short cuts. In the manuals that come with the box, salve there is normally shortcut charts. If you did the download, you can find them online. Most Adobe apps have the ability to re-assign key-board short cuts as well. I would suggest against it, unless it is necessary, because if you ever go to work at a different location, or have to show someone something on a different computer, it helps if the shortcuts are the same. Some reasons we have had to change shortcuts in the past are, In Illustrator CS2 and previous, The shortcut for switching between the hollow and solid arrow selection tools, was Command + Tab (Ctrl + Tab on PC). On a mac, all the way back to OS 8, would instead toggle the application switcher. So instead of getting the hollow arrow selection tool, you would get a web browser or other open app instead.

In Photoshop CS2 and before, Command + Option + D (Ctrl + Alt + D on PC)was the short – cut for Feather Selection. On a Mac since the introduction on the dock, that shortcut was used to toggle the dock to appear and disappear. Both of these shortcuts were easily fixed by customizing the shortcuts to require and extra Key. That way Command + Option + Tab to toggle the selection Arrows in Illustrator and Command + Option + Shift + D to get the Feather section dialog box.

I believe Illustrator CS3 now comes pre-modified? (I seriously can not remember if I had to change that or not and I can not find any documentation on the Toggle Selection Arrow short cut as it this post). But Photoshop CS3 has done away with the Feather Selection dialog box and replaced it with Refine Edge which is Command + Option + R (Ctrl + Alt + R on PC).

Here is a resource for keyboard shortcuts. They are not complete, but in a easier format to print.
http://www.keyxl.com/
Also for Photoshop Only Shortcuts :
http://www.photoshopsupport.com/tutorials/jennifer/keyboard-shortcuts.html

Flash:
http://www.adobe.com/go/tn_12105

Official Adobe help docs:
http://livedocs.adobe.com/en_US/Illustrator/13.0/WS714a382cdf7d304e7e07d0100196cbc5f-642a.html

http://livedocs.adobe.com/en_US/Photoshop/10.0/WSfd1234e1c4b69f30ea53e41001031ab64-76b9.html

http://livedocs.adobe.com/flash/9.0/UsingFlash/WS4B6E7EC1-81C9-4d9d-96C0-9C01EB96E1FA.html
With the nature of vectors being smaller than bitmap images in file size, buy more about I typically try to illustrate everything I do for Flash in Illustrator first. I love Illustrator as an illustration tool. Although Flash has made some great progress it’s illustration tool set, store it just does not come close to the power and features of Illustrator. I also find Illustrator really fast for laying out design projects and more illustrative graphics then modeling and detailing in photoshop. Like any relationship, my affection for illustrator is not without frustration and we have to learn to accept some of the faults, if you can pardon my Dr. Phil type metaphor, to make it work. So here are some workarounds for some illustrator issues and a couple tips to help you work better with this great tool.


1. New Document Profiles:
Tired of deleting all the colors, brushes and symbols every time you create a new Illustrator document? Sick of making a new template because you accidentally saved over that last one? Illustrator uses Template files for each document profile. Those template files are standard .ai files so you can edit the source of each profile with ease. By deleting all those colors, brushes, and symbols out of these template files, all the new documents you create will only contain the elements and setting you want. You can even create new profiles.
On a Mac they are located in the Library/Application Support/Adobe/Adobe Illustrator CS3/New Document Profiles folder.
On the PC look in Documents and Settings /*User Name*/Application Data/Adobe/Adobe Illustrator CS3 Settings/New Document Profiles/


default swatches
default brushes
default symbols

If you add a new file, it will show up in the profile drop down of the new file dialog box.

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2. Free Transform Tool (works the same way in Photoshop and Flash):
This is one of the most powerful tools in the tools palette. If you can imagine the Oxy Clean guy going on about this tool, that’s how great it is.
The real power comes in the form of augmenting it’s functionality with keyboard keys. After selecting a node of the free transform tool bounding box, add the following keys to change its behavior. ***The key is to select a node first, then adding the extra keys. These special keys are:
Shift: Constrains scaling to the original aspect ratio, rotation to 45 degrees, free distort to limited angles, and skew to current height or width.
Command (Ctrl PC): Free distort of corner or side. Works well for mapping and tweaking flat artwork onto a plane in perspective.
Command + Option (Ctrl + Alt PC): Skewing
Command + Option + Shift (Ctrl + Alt + Shift PC): Shear, takes an object and lays it back in perspective.

Free Transform

3. Nudging artwork with the arrow keys:
On some older machines this seems to be more of an issue. When you nudge selected items around the art board, sometimes you do not see the results for a second or two. Normally, it happens with large complex artwork. I find that if I tap Shift, Command (Ctrl), or Space bar, the screen refreshes and I can see the results a lot faster. Holding the Shift key while you nudge is like a 10x nudge. To clarify, 10 normal arrow only nudges equal 1 shift + arrow nudge.

4. PathFinder divide and unite:
There are two buttons in the Pathfinder Palette that I use the most, Divide and Unite. From the old days of spot color separations, I have been trained to keep my artwork as clean as possible. This is also important if you want to animate vector artwork and make sure it does not blow up when you bring it over to Flash. Uniting shapes that have the same color helps to keep your artwork organized and clean.
Pathfinder is a huge timesaver while illustrating. The less lines you have to put down saves time. Especially if those extra lines are tracing existing lines. I will give an illustration tutorial and go over this technique in greater detail. But here is a simple tip for now. If you have a single shape that you want to fill with two different colors, do not draw another shape, copy the original and divide it.
In the example below:

Unite and Divide

A. shows a shape, with it selected, copy & paste in front. Draw a path, select the top copy and the new path & divide. Delete the top half.
B. shows the original shape with a 6 point stroke. Select the original shape, copy & paste behind. Add the 6 point stroke, expand and unite. *for best results, change the gradient to a solid color before expanding.
C. Shows the final button. The benefits of this technique are: 1. I can modify the the bottom shadow shape, like adding an arch or wave without having to match it with a top shape. 2. We preserve the original shape for easier editing later. 3. very clean artwork.

5. Align & Average:
If you ever spend more then a second wondering if something is centered, you are wasting time. Open that align palette and force those objects to be centered, justified or spaced out evenly. Nothing looks worse then artwork that is so close to being aligned, but just a tad off. Align only works on items that are ungrouped or multiple groups.
Average is like align, but only works on path nodes. Sometimes while illustrating a line, it takes a second or two to get a line perfectly straight. Just select the two nodes and use the Average dialog ( Command + Option + J mac) (Ctrl + Alt + J PC) and choose horizontal or vertical. and they will straighten right up.


Align palette
Average Dialog

6. Selection preferences. Arrows and Type:
By default the preference (Selection & Anchor Display) for “Object Selection By Path Only” is not checked, meaning you can select an object by clicking anywhere on the object face. You can select items underneath by toggling preview to wireframe (Command + Y or Ctrl + Y). By enabling this feature, you will be able to select shapes without toggling Preview, hiding or locking other objects, which will make you more efficient. It may take some getting used to if you have been using the default setting all along. Likewise, there is a preference for “Type Object Selection By Path Only”, which is disabled by default. Enabling it will allow you to select paths behind or around text.

Selection Prefs

7. Colors and swatches:
I would like to do a whole post on color swatches and illustration soon, but until then, color swatches can be your friend. I do not mean the ones that are in the swatches palette when you open a new document. If you read the earlier tip, we should be rid of them by now. Making a custom color palette based on mood, branding or whatever you want to communicate is scores better than making up colors on the fly or picking colors because they just happen to be in the color palette. Most computers can display 16 million colors telling us there are a many more Hughes of green then the lime and forest green in the default color palette. Saving colors to swatches saves us from trying to make the same color over and over. Saving colors as spot color is cool for certain printing jobs and if you ever want to update a color, you can do it one time and every object filled or stoked with that color will be updated as well. The down side is spot colors make horrible gradients. I normally stick with RGB swatches and use Select Same Fill or Stroke Color to update colors if that arrises. Also, if you have an illustrator file with a a bunch of swatches and you need them in a new illustrator document. You can use Window/Swatch Libraries/Other library and a new swatch pallet will appear with the needed swatches from the Previous Illustrator file.


New Colors

8. Actions (same in Photoshop):
Actions are the coolest thing since Command + Z (Ctrl + Z PC). There are certain combinations of tasks that I perform at least 50 times or more in a single illustration. I make actions of those combos and assign an F key to it. This saves tons of time. My most use actions are probably Expand + Unite, which merges the stoke and fill into one shape. The other is Place just because there is not a default keyboard shortcut for that menu item. I also use actions for special transforms that I will have to do more then once or we can build template files with actions so that anyone with illustrator or Photoshop can recreate the transforms to match the original. ** The most important thing to know about actions is saving them. I keep apps open for weeks at a time. Any crash during that time will erase any actions you have created.

9. Just say no to strokes:
One of the most time consuming things about Flash development is fixing artwork imported from illustrator. With CS3 that chore has been greatly reduced, but there are still a few things that still do not translate the same. Strokes are a large contributer to some vector artwork in flash looking terrible. If you try to Convert Stokes to Fills in Flash, many times most of the stroke will just disappear. It is best to do all that in Illustrator using the previous tip, as well as some good planning to keep your artwork clean. There are some good reasons to use strokes in Flash, otherwise getting rid of them in Illustrator will make life much easier and your graphics looking better.

Cleanup Strokes

10. Grouping:
One of the reasons Illustrator is so much more efficient then photoshop for comping up rough layouts is that you do not need to know what layer the artwork is on to move or transform it. You just select the artwork directly and transform away. Using groups wisely will diminish the amount of time it takes to make selections. Once an section of an illustration is complete, you should make it into a group. The next time you need to transform that group, it is only one click away. Using the Command + Option + Tab (Ctrl + Alt + Tab PC) to toggle the open and closed arrow selections tools will make the different types of selections happen a lot quicker. Also Command + Option + Double-Click (Ctrl + Alt + Double-Click PC) with the open arrow selection tool will select a sub-ground within a group. Another click will add the whole group to the selection.

Ever need a compressed bitmap file with 24 bit transparency, link but with the application being delivered over the web, pill you need that file to be small. Gif files only have 8bit – aliased transparency and a 256 color limit. 24bit png files have transparency, pharmacy but are lossless and are often produce large file sizes. Jpegs are perfect compression-wise but do not include transparency, or do they….



The Solution: Flash
Import your 24-bit transparent png into Flash and Double-click no the file in the Flash project library.



Set your compression settings to jpeg at the quality settings of your choice, also set to smooth if you are planning on scaling or rotating the image. You could also set a global compression setting in File > Publish Settings > Flash tab. Now publish your file and you will get a swf with a transparent image using jpeg compression that is much smaller then a png. In this test, compressed at 70% quality the swf was just under half the size of the original png, even with an animation included.



Uses:
1. For anything you need 24 bit transparent bitmaps in Flash.

2. Convert each bitmap to a MovieClip symbol and use the Flex Component for Flash toolkit to convert each image into a Flex component. Export the swc and place it in the libs folder of you Flex project. Now you have compressed bitmap images with 24bit transparency for use in your Flex project, at a faction of the size.





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The Demo:

[kml_flashembed fversion=”10.0.0″ movie=”http://www.taterboy.com/blog/flash/chessDesign.swf” targetclass=”flashmovie” publishmethod=”static” width=”500″ height=”400″]

Get Adobe Flash player

[/kml_flashembed]

Ever need a compressed bitmap file with 24 bit transparency, viagra but with the application being delivered over the web, order you need that file to be small. Gif files only have 8bit – aliased transparency and a 256 color limit. 24bit png files have transparency, but are lossless and are often produce large file sizes. Jpegs are perfect compression-wise but do not include transparency, or do they….



The Solution: Flash
Import your 24-bit transparent png into Flash and Double-click no the file in the Flash project library.



Set your compression settings to jpeg at the quality settings of your choice, also set to smooth if you are planning on scaling or rotating the image. You could also set a global compression setting in File > Publish Settings > Flash tab. Now publish your file and you will get a swf with a transparent image using jpeg compression that is much smaller then a png. In this test, compressed at 70% quality the swf was just under half the size of the original png, even with an animation included.



Uses:
1. For anything you need 24 bit transparent bitmaps in Flash.

2. Convert each bitmap to a MovieClip symbol and use the Flex Component for Flash toolkit to convert each image into a Flex component. Export the swc and place it in the libs folder of you Flex project. Now you have compressed bitmap images with 24bit transparency for use in your Flex project, at a faction of the size.





[ad#content_banner]

The Demo:

[kml_flashembed fversion=”10.0.0″ movie=”http://www.taterboy.com/blog/flash/chessDesign.swf” targetclass=”flashmovie” publishmethod=”static” width=”500″ height=”400″]

Get Adobe Flash player

[/kml_flashembed]

Dr. Skully’s Mirror of misfortune is the worlds first augmented reality fortune teller. Print out the AR marker and ask the Dr. questions about love, symptoms work, unhealthy money, site and style. Your journey to the this oracle is always rewarded with the wit, charm and brutal honesty that only a true sage like Dr. Skully can summon. Get your fortune today, if you dare.

You can visit Dr. Skully’s Mirror of Misfortune at http://drskully.com or the Dr. Skully Facebook app.



Dr. Skully’s Mirror of Misfortune was built using Flash and the FLAR Tool Kit.


[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxRaZekPofo?fs=1&hl=en_US&w=480&h=385]

Dr. Skully’s Mirror of misfortune is the worlds first augmented reality fortune teller. Print out the AR marker and ask the Dr. questions about love, information pills work, prescription money, and style. Your journey to the this oracle is always rewarded with the wit, charm and brutal honesty that only a true sage like Dr. Skully can summon. Get your fortune today, if you dare.

You can visit Dr. Skully’s Mirror of misfortune at http://drskully.com or the Dr. Skully Facebook app.



Dr. Skully’s Mirror of Misfortune was built using Flash and the FLAR Tool Kit.


[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxRaZekPofo?fs=1&hl=en_US&w=480&h=385]

Dr. Skully’s Mirror of misfortune is the worlds first augmented reality fortune teller. Print out the AR marker and ask the Dr. questions about love, viagra 40mg work, advice money, and style. Your journey to the this oracle is always rewarded with the wit, charm and brutal honesty that only a true sage like Dr. Skully can summon. Get your fortune today, if you dare.

You can visit Dr. Skully’s Mirror of misfortune at http://drskully.com or the Dr. Skully Facebook app.



Dr. Skully’s Mirror of Misfortune was built using Flash and the FLAR Tool Kit.


[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxRaZekPofo?fs=1&hl=en_US&w=480&h=385]

Dr. Skully’s Mirror of misfortune is the worlds first augmented reality fortune teller. Print out the AR marker and ask the Dr. questions about love, patient work, treatment money, buy and style. Your journey to the this oracle is always rewarded with the wit, charm and brutal honesty that only a true sage like Dr. Skully can summon. Get your fortune today, if you dare.

You can visit Dr. Skully’s Mirror of misfortune at http://drskully.com or the Dr. Skully Facebook app.



Dr. Skully’s Mirror of Misfortune was built using Flash and the FLAR Tool Kit.


[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxRaZekPofo?fs=1&hl=en_US&w=480&h=385]

Dr. Skully’s Mirror of misfortune is the worlds first augmented reality fortune teller. Print out the AR marker and ask the Dr. questions about love, approved work, ed money, and style. Your journey to the this oracle is always rewarded with the wit, charm and brutal honesty that only a true sage like Dr. Skully can summon. Get your fortune today, if you dare.

You can visit Dr. Skully’s Mirror of Misfortune at http://drskully.com or the Dr. Skully Facebook app.



Dr. Skully’s Mirror of Misfortune was built using Flash and the FLAR Tool Kit.


[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxRaZekPofo?fs=1&hl=en_US&w=480&h=385]



Sorry to waiting so long to post this, information pills if you haven’t heard and would like to participate in the Illustrative international festival for contemporary illustration and graphic arts, buy you will need to get your submissions in by October 22, 2010 to be considered for the award.

The festival will be in Berlin on May 6, 2011.
Find out more at www.Illustrative.de

swatch-2010-young-illustrative-award

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