Privacy UX: Better Cookie Consent Experiences

Privacy UX: Better Cookie Consent Experiences Privacy UX: Better Cookie Consent Experiences Vitaly Friedman 2019-04-10T15:00:49+02:002019-04-11T11:06:08+00:00 Part 1: Common Concerns And Privacy In Web Forms Part 2: Better Cookie Consent Experiences Part 3: Designing Better Notifications Part 4: Privacy-Aware Design Framework With the advent of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in May 2018, the web has turned into a vast exhibition of consent pop-ups, notifications, toolbars, and modals. While the intent of most cookie-related prompts is the same — to get a user’s consent to keep collecting and evaluating their behavior the same ol’ way they’ve been doing for years — implementations differ significantly, often making it ridiculously difficult or simply impossible for customers to opt out from tracking. On top of that, many implementations don’t even respect users’ decisions anyway and set cookies despite their choices, assuming that most people will grant consent regardless. Admittedly, they aren’t entirely Read the full article…

The definitive Niantic reading guide

In just a few years, Niantic has evolved from internal side project into an independent industry trailblazer. Having reached tremendous scale in such a short period of time, Niantic acts as a poignant crash course for founders and company builders. As our EC-1 deep-dive into the company shows, lessons from the team’s experience building the Niantic’s product offering remain just as fresh as painful flashbacks to the problems encountered along the way. As we did for our Patreon EC-1, we’ve poured through every analysis we could find on Niantic and have compiled a supplemental list of resources and readings that are particularly useful for getting up to speed on the company. Reading time for this article is about 9.5 minutes. It is part of the Extra Crunch EC-1 on Niantic. Feature illustration by Bryce Durbin / TechCrunch. I. Background: The Story of Niantic Google-Incubated Niantic, Maker of Ingress, Stepping Out on Read the full article…

Esports org OverActive Media gets investment from The Weeknd

OverActive Media, the company that owns the Splyce esports org and the Overwatch League’s Toronto Defiant team, have announced that The Weeknd (real name: Abel Tesfaye) has invested in the company. In the world of esports, OAM is a big organization — the Toronto-based company, which launched in 2017, has teams in the League of Legends European Championship, Overwatch League, Call of Duty World League, Rocket League, Starcraft and Smite. OAM is one of only five esports orgs in the world with permanent slots both in League of Legends and the Overwatch League. If you have no idea what I’m talking about, here’s a look at one of the Toronto Defiant’s recent Overwatch League games. The terms of the investment were not disclosed, but it would appear that The Weeknd will be contributing to some marketing efforts and building brand awareness around Splyce and the Toronto Defiant. “Abel’s standing in Read the full article…

New footage emerges of most notorious Street Fighter moment in history

If you’ve only ever seen one piece of footage of competitive video gaming, there’s a good chance it’s this one: the “Daigo Parry” or “Evo Moment #37,” taken from Daigo Umehara’s Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike semi-final match against Justin Wong at Evo 2004. A legitimate feat of manual dexterity and timing that makes Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice look like Spyro the Dragon, Daigo’s incredible fifteen-parry comeback with just a pixel of health left drove the crowd wild. Now there’s a whole new way to watch it. Mark Julio, a notable figure in the fighting game community who works on the Evo tournaments among other things, dug up some new footage himself and posted it to YouTube. The audio is almost more interesting than the video, as you can… Read the full article…

PlayStation users can now change their PSN names

If you’re not happy with your PSN name, Sony is letting PlayStation users change it starting today. The feature launched in beta in October 2018, but anyone will be able to do it either on their PS4 console or through a browser. I’m one of those cool people who makes all of my usernames into a play on my actual name, so I’m still pretty happy with “faulknerd,” but if your PSN name doesn’t xX_reflect_Xx the current you, it’s easy to change it. In terms of pricing, the first name change is free. After that, if you decide that you’d like to change it again, it’ll cost you $9.99 each time. But if you are a PlayStation Plus subscriber, it’s only $4.99 for repeat name adjustments. Sony claims in its FAQ that your old usernames will still… Read the full article…

Earth Defense Force: Iron Rain Review

I have this thing. I hate cucumber. I hate it so much. But no matter how much I explain why, most people don’t understand. I must just taste it differently than other people. It’s a fundamental, maybe even genetic difference. I get it, others don’t. I think D3 Publisher might have realised that there’s a similar problem at the heart of the Earth Defense Force series – one Earth Defense Force: Iron Rain only somewhat successfully attempts to fix. EDF is the anti-cucumber. Fans love its quantity-over-quality approach to content; its enormous, gorgeously mindless combat scenarios; its ‘is this supposed to be funny?’ storytelling and voiceovers; and even the way the series’ wildly outdated looks skitter across the screen with a perverse, stubborn charm. You might be able to tell that I am one of these people. But no matter how much you show it to friends and try to Read the full article…