Videvo: Free, High-Quality Visuals for Your Website

Looking to create more engagement or interaction on your website? Video might be the answer. According to some of the latest data, using video can increase engagement, is a favorite among website visitors and customers, and actually increases overall return on investment. The takeaway? You need to be using video content. If you aren’t sure where to start, look no further than Videvo. It’s packed with stock videos that you can download and use in projects. Here’s how it works. What is Videvo? Videvo is a stock video resource with thousands of stock videos and motion graphics, as well as audio tracks in one place. You can browse footage options by category or using search. (The same goes for sound effects and music.) And everything is free to use in personal and commercial projects. The creators of Videvo tell their story like this: Let’s face it, stock footage and audio Read the full article…

10 Best Free Stock Video Sites in 2019

Need video? From moving images for your own website, to b-roll for clients, having a solid place to find quality stock videos is a must. Today, we’re going to help you “stock” your toolkit with ten places to find amazing, free stock video for a variety of projects. We are giving you basic information about using stock videos from each vendor; make sure to check specific license agreements before using any stock image or video. These can vary quite a bit, and it’s worth making sure that any video use is a good fit for your project license-wise! 1. MixKit MixKit is packed with free HD videos. Videos are grouped on the site by category and include some stunning imagery. The options include subtle b-roll such as abstract water droplets all the way to a raving club scene. And everything looks authentic with a modern video style. New videos are Read the full article…

The team behind Baidu’s first smart speaker is now using AI to make films

The HBO sci-fi blockbuster Westworld has been an inspiring look into what humanlike robots can do for us in the meatspace. While current technologies are not quite advanced enough to make Westworld a reality, startups are attempting to replicate the sort of human-robot interaction it presents in virtual space. Rct studio, which just graduated from Y Combinator and ranked among TechCrunch’s nine favorite picks from the batch, is one of them. The “Westworld” in the TV series, a far-future theme park staffed by highly convincing androids, lets visitors live out their heroic and sadistic fantasies free of consequences. There are a few reasons why rct studio, which is keeping mum about the meaning of its deliberately lower-cased name for later revelation, is going for the computer-generated world. Besides the technical challenge, playing a fictional universe out virtually does away the geographic constraint. The Westworld experience, in contrast, happens within a Read the full article…

Photographs is a tragic short story collection in the form of a puzzle game

Designer Luca Redwood has a knack for turning puzzle games into something bigger. It started with 10000000, which combined match-3 and RPG elements into rapid-fire action, and it continued with You Must Build a Boat, which added dungeon-crawling adventure gameplay to the formula. But Redwood’s latest game is also his most ambitious: with Photographs, he’s out to prove a puzzle game can also tell a story. The game is divided into five chapters, each of which tells a different story. They’re all fairly short; as long as you don’t get majorly stuck on any puzzles, you can finish each chapter in around 30 minutes. You start out following the story of an alchemist, an old man with an apothecary shop in the woods and a young granddaughter who… Read the full article…

A Transparent Approach to Project Estimation, Part 1

By Leo Frishberg Whether you’re doing business development for an agency or an in-house UX group, to win a stakeholder’s business, you must provide a value proposition that makes your services more attractive than those of your competitors. If you’re managing a project, a team, or a business that depends on the delivery of services, it’s essential that you negotiate the project scope and ensure your stakeholders understand what you’ll be delivering before beginning work. It’s also important to reconcile the project scope and track status along the way and to manage costs and stakeholder expectations—not to mention your contractual obligations. In this article, I’ll describe the approach that I devised for scoping, estimating, and reconciling services at Phase II, an external agency, and have since applied as an internal service provider at Intel and The Home Depot. The scoping and estimating spreadsheet that I created has evolved over the Read the full article…

Lead, Don’t Manage, Part 2

By Jim Nieters In Part 1 of this two-part series, I highlighted some of the important differences between a manager and a leader. I also described how, when managers manage employees, that often means they’re directing employees to do things the way they would do them. Such managers function as critics rather than coaches. The challenge is that, when managers are more critical than constructive, they diminish their employees. In contrast, good leaders are multipliers who inspire their employees to execute better than even those employees thought possible. When employees execute well and are happy, their leaders are usually successful, too. I also discussed the importance of being an advocate who coaches employees rather than acting as a critical adversary. Read the full article…

How to Explain UX Research to Skeptical Stakeholders

By Meghan Wenzel One day at work, a bright, young engineer approached me, asking how things were going. He said, “I’m curious about UX research. But isn’t asking people what they want a bad way to approach product development? Didn’t Henry Ford say, “If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said ‘faster horses’?” I thought this was a great question, and it gave me an opportunity to dispel some misconceptions about UX research. So I replied, “Great question! Actually, we don’t ask people what they want because you’re exactly right that they probably wouldn’t give us a productive answer. It’s not their job to design the next great product. It’s ours!” Instead of asking participants what our next product or feature should be, UX researchers take a much more nuanced approach. UX research involves careful observation of users along with targeted inquiry and thoughtful analysis. Read Read the full article…