One of the greatest advantages of creating skins in Flash opposed to Illustrator or Photoshop is the amount of control over how the skin looks and functions. In Flash you can export all your skins as Flex components in a swc file which allows you to use those components as both classes or artwork. The flexibility comes in handy when building custom working/looking components. Button skins can be applied using the skin property with all of the states included in 1 skin class instead of four different images or symbols. You can even add transitional animations in between states.

The WorkWatcher Header:
We developed WorkWatcher, there buy this a business management AIR application, cheapest in Flex with all the skins designed in Illustrator and Flash. One of the interesting skins is the header bar with the stripes also needed to be able to stretch. The stripes are added or removed as the header width changes without distortion, seek creating a true tiling effect.

For the header, we used 1(stripe) as a Flex component class and another as a background image with scale9grid turned applied. It took a couple tries to get things working purfectly, so the flexibility really helped and opened up possibilities that are not available to image files.


Note: Keeping your skins vector really has an advantage over bitmap skins, because of the way they work with the scale9grid. Scale9Grid works best in Flash with vector artwork, instead of bitmap. Even with scale9grid turned on in the MovieClip properties, the bitmap still stretches.

Flex Component Kit for Flash:
To get started using Flash to build Flex components you will need to download the Flex Component Kit for Flash and the Flex Skin Design Extensions. (login to Adobe labs required)
Once you have them installed, You will find a new menu item in the commands menu. Create all your skins or components as MovieClips, use the “Convert Symbol to Flex Component” menu command and publish.

You should also now have a Flex Skin Template that has all the major component skins. After publishing a new SWC file with be produced along with an swf(which we do not need). The SWC goes into the “libs” directory of your Flex project and the contained classes will be available for use in Flex. The hardest part is remembering the class names you made in Flash.

Using Flash Skins in Flex:
If you add a stop() action to a keyframe in Flash, you will be able to import the SWC similar to how you import any other class.

import TiledHeaderSkins_fla.MainTimeline;

If you have xmlns:local=”*” set in your applications properties, then the skinClasses will show up in Flex’s Class code complete list to declare variable types or mxml components. To use a skinComponent as a skin, you can apply them directly to the skin property in the mxml component or as a style.

Use for mxml Button:

<mx:Button id="myBtn" label="Press This" skin="{myBtnSkin}" />

Use as Style:

backgroundImage: Embed(skinClass='HeaderBackground');

The Striped Header Sample:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<mx:Application xmlns:mx="http://www.adobe.com/2006/mxml" layout="absolute" xmlns:local="*" creationComplete="init()">
<mx:Style>
.tiledBackground{
backgroundImage: Embed(skinClass='HeaderBackground');
backgroundSize: "100%";
}
</mx:Style>
<mx:Script>
<![CDATA[
 
/* import TiledHeaderSkins_fla.MainTimeline; */
 
//how far apart to place the stripes
private var span:int = 18;
 
//clear and add stripes on event resize
private function resizeHandler(ev:Event):void{
stripeHolder.removeAllChildren();
makeStripes();
}
 
//add strips until stripes width is equal to header width
private function makeStripes():void{
var stripeX:int = 0;
var barWidth:int = tiledBkg.width;
while(stripeX < barWidth){
var stripe:HeaderStripe = new HeaderStripe();
stripe.x = stripeX;
 
stripeHolder.addChild(stripe);
stripeX += span;
}
}
 
//set on resize event listener and add stripes
private function init():void
{
addEventListener(Event.RESIZE,resizeHandler);
makeStripes();
}
 
]]>
</mx:Script>
<mx:Canvas id="tiledBkg" width="100%" height="40" styleName="tiledBackground">
<mx:Canvas id="stripeHolder" width="100%" height="100%" horizontalScrollPolicy="off" verticalScrollPolicy="off" />
</mx:Canvas>
</mx:Application>

Download the source here.

You can find more information in the Flash CS4 reference guide.
http://help.adobe.com/en_US/Flash/10.0_UsingFlash/WSFD77A256-0DE1-46c7-86FB-CC4A8AE2EAA6.html
One of the greatest advantages of creating skins in Flash opposed to Illustrator or Photoshop is the amount of control over how the skin looks and functions. In Flash you can export all your skins as Flex components in a swc file which allows you to use those components as both classes or artwork. The flexibility comes in handy when building custom working/looking components. Button skins can be applied using the skin property with all of the states included in 1 skin class instead of four different images or symbols. You can even add transitional animations in between states.

The WorkWatcher Header:
We developed WorkWatcher, buy this a business management AIR application, in Flex with all the skins designed in Illustrator and Flash. One of the interesting skins is the header bar with the stripes also needed to be able to stretch. The stripes are added or removed as the header width changes without distortion, creating a true tiling effect.

For the header, we used 1(stripe) as a Flex component class and another as a background image with scale9grid turned applied. It took a couple tries to get things working purfectly, so the flexibility really helped and opened up possibilities that are not available to image files.


Note: Keeping your skins vector really has an advantage over bitmap skins, because of the way they work with the scale9grid. Scale9Grid works best in Flash with vector artwork, instead of bitmap. Even with scale9grid turned on in the MovieClip properties, the bitmap still stretches.

Flex Component Kit for Flash:
To get started using Flash to build Flex components you will need to download the Flex Component Kit for Flash and the Flex Skin Design Extensions. (login to Adobe labs required)
Once you have them installed, You will find a new menu item in the commands menu. Create all your skins or components as MovieClips, use the “Convert Symbol to Flex Component” menu command and publish.

You should also now have a Flex Skin Template that has all the major component skins. After publishing a new SWC file with be produced along with an swf(which we do not need). The SWC goes into the “libs” directory of your Flex project and the contained classes will be available for use in Flex. The hardest part is remembering the class names you made in Flash.

Using Flash Skins in Flex:
If you add a stop() action to a keyframe in Flash, you will be able to import the SWC similar to how you import any other class.

import TiledHeaderSkins_fla.MainTimeline;

If you have xmlns:local=”*” set in your applications properties, then the skinClasses will show up in Flex’s Class code complete list to declare variable types or mxml components. To use a skinComponent as a skin, you can apply them directly to the skin property in the mxml component or as a style.

Use for mxml Button:

<mx:Button id="myBtn" label="Press This" skin="{myBtnSkin}" />

Use as Style:

backgroundImage: Embed(skinClass='HeaderBackground');

The Striped Header Sample:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<mx:Application xmlns:mx="http://www.adobe.com/2006/mxml" layout="absolute" xmlns:local="*" creationComplete="init()">
<mx:Style>
.tiledBackground{
backgroundImage: Embed(skinClass='HeaderBackground');
backgroundSize: "100%";
}
</mx:Style>
<mx:Script>
<![CDATA[
 
/* import TiledHeaderSkins_fla.MainTimeline; */
 
//how far apart to place the stripes
private var span:int = 18;
 
//clear and add stripes on event resize
private function resizeHandler(ev:Event):void{
stripeHolder.removeAllChildren();
makeStripes();
}
 
//add strips until stripes width is equal to header width
private function makeStripes():void{
var stripeX:int = 0;
var barWidth:int = tiledBkg.width;
while(stripeX < barWidth){
var stripe:HeaderStripe = new HeaderStripe();
stripe.x = stripeX;
 
stripeHolder.addChild(stripe);
stripeX += span;
}
}
 
//set on resize event listener and add stripes
private function init():void
{
addEventListener(Event.RESIZE,resizeHandler);
makeStripes();
}
 
]]>
</mx:Script>
<mx:Canvas id="tiledBkg" width="100%" height="40" styleName="tiledBackground">
<mx:Canvas id="stripeHolder" width="100%" height="100%" horizontalScrollPolicy="off" verticalScrollPolicy="off" />
</mx:Canvas>
</mx:Application>

Download the source here.

You can find more information in the Flash CS4 reference guide.
http://help.adobe.com/en_US/Flash/10.0_UsingFlash/WSFD77A256-0DE1-46c7-86FB-CC4A8AE2EAA6.html
One of the greatest advantages of creating skins in Flash opposed to Illustrator or Photoshop is the amount of control over how the skin looks and functions. In Flash you can export all your skins as Flex components in a swc file which allows you to use those components as both classes or artwork. The flexibility comes in handy when building custom working/looking components. Button skins can be applied using the skin property with all of the states included in 1 skin class instead of four different images or symbols. You can even add transitional animations in between states.

The WorkWatcher Header:
We developed WorkWatcher, cost a business management AIR application, information pills in Flex with all the skins designed in Illustrator and Flash. One of the interesting skins is the header bar with the stripes also needed to be able to stretch. The stripes are added or removed as the header width changes without distortion, salve creating a true tiling effect.

For the header, we used 1(stripe) as a Flex component class and another as a background image with scale9grid turned applied. It took a couple tries to get things working purfectly, so the flexibility really helped and opened up possibilities that are not available to image files.


Note: Keeping your skins vector really has an advantage over bitmap skins, because of the way they work with the scale9grid. Scale9Grid works best in Flash with vector artwork, instead of bitmap. Even with scale9grid turned on in the MovieClip properties, the bitmap still stretches.

Flex Component Kit for Flash:
To get started using Flash to build Flex components you will need to download the Flex Component Kit for Flash and the Flex Skin Design Extensions. (login to Adobe labs required)
Once you have them installed, You will find a new menu item in the commands menu. Create all your skins or components as MovieClips, use the “Convert Symbol to Flex Component” menu command and publish.

You should also now have a Flex Skin Template that has all the major component skins. After publishing a new SWC file with be produced along with an swf(which we do not need). The SWC goes into the “libs” directory of your Flex project and the contained classes will be available for use in Flex. The hardest part is remembering the class names you made in Flash.

Using Flash Skins in Flex:
If you add a stop() action to a keyframe in Flash, you will be able to import the SWC similar to how you import any other class.

import TiledHeaderSkins_fla.MainTimeline;

If you have xmlns:local=”*” set in your applications properties, then the skinClasses will show up in Flex’s Class code complete list to declare variable types or mxml components. To use a skinComponent as a skin, you can apply them directly to the skin property in the mxml component or as a style.

Use for mxml Button:

<mx:Button id="myBtn" label="Press This" skin="{myBtnSkin}" />

Use as Style:

backgroundImage: Embed(skinClass='HeaderBackground');

The Striped Header Sample:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<mx:Application xmlns:mx="http://www.adobe.com/2006/mxml" layout="absolute" xmlns:local="*" creationComplete="init()">
<mx:Style>
.tiledBackground{
backgroundImage: Embed(skinClass='HeaderBackground');
backgroundSize: "100%";
}
</mx:Style>
<mx:Script>
<![CDATA[
 
/* import TiledHeaderSkins_fla.MainTimeline; */
 
//how far apart to place the stripes
private var span:int = 18;
 
//clear and add stripes on event resize
private function resizeHandler(ev:Event):void{
stripeHolder.removeAllChildren();
makeStripes();
}
 
//add strips until stripes width is equal to header width
private function makeStripes():void{
var stripeX:int = 0;
var barWidth:int = tiledBkg.width;
while(stripeX < barWidth){
var stripe:HeaderStripe = new HeaderStripe();
stripe.x = stripeX;
 
stripeHolder.addChild(stripe);
stripeX += span;
}
}
 
//set on resize event listener and add stripes
private function init():void
{
addEventListener(Event.RESIZE,resizeHandler);
makeStripes();
}
 
]]>
</mx:Script>
<mx:Canvas id="tiledBkg" width="100%" height="40" styleName="tiledBackground">
<mx:Canvas id="stripeHolder" width="100%" height="100%" horizontalScrollPolicy="off" verticalScrollPolicy="off" />
</mx:Canvas>
</mx:Application>

Download the source here.

You can find more information in the Flash CS4 reference guide.
http://help.adobe.com/en_US/Flash/10.0_UsingFlash/WSFD77A256-0DE1-46c7-86FB-CC4A8AE2EAA6.html
One of the greatest advantages of creating skins in Flash opposed to Illustrator or Photoshop is the amount of control over how the skin looks and functions. In Flash you can export all your skins as Flex components in a swc file which allows you to use those components as both classes or artwork. The flexibility comes in handy when building custom working/looking components. Button skins can be applied using the skin property with all of the states included in 1 skin class instead of four different images or symbols. You can even add transitional animations in between states.

The WorkWatcher Header:
We developed WorkWatcher, buy this a business management AIR application, in Flex with all the skins designed in Illustrator and Flash. One of the interesting skins is the header bar with the stripes also needed to be able to stretch. The stripes are added or removed as the header width changes without distortion, creating a true tiling effect.

For the header, we used 1(stripe) as a Flex component class and another as a background image with scale9grid turned applied. It took a couple tries to get things working purfectly, so the flexibility really helped and opened up possibilities that are not available to image files.


Note: Keeping your skins vector really has an advantage over bitmap skins, because of the way they work with the scale9grid. Scale9Grid works best in Flash with vector artwork, instead of bitmap. Even with scale9grid turned on in the MovieClip properties, the bitmap still stretches.

Flex Component Kit for Flash:
To get started using Flash to build Flex components you will need to download the Flex Component Kit for Flash and the Flex Skin Design Extensions. (login to Adobe labs required)
Once you have them installed, You will find a new menu item in the commands menu. Create all your skins or components as MovieClips, use the “Convert Symbol to Flex Component” menu command and publish.

You should also now have a Flex Skin Template that has all the major component skins. After publishing a new SWC file with be produced along with an swf(which we do not need). The SWC goes into the “libs” directory of your Flex project and the contained classes will be available for use in Flex. The hardest part is remembering the class names you made in Flash.

Using Flash Skins in Flex:
If you add a stop() action to a keyframe in Flash, you will be able to import the SWC similar to how you import any other class.

import TiledHeaderSkins_fla.MainTimeline;

If you have xmlns:local=”*” set in your applications properties, then the skinClasses will show up in Flex’s Class code complete list to declare variable types or mxml components. To use a skinComponent as a skin, you can apply them directly to the skin property in the mxml component or as a style.

Use for mxml Button:

<mx:Button id="myBtn" label="Press This" skin="{myBtnSkin}" />

Use as Style:

backgroundImage: Embed(skinClass='HeaderBackground');

The Striped Header Sample:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<mx:Application xmlns:mx="http://www.adobe.com/2006/mxml" layout="absolute" xmlns:local="*" creationComplete="init()">
<mx:Style>
.tiledBackground{
backgroundImage: Embed(skinClass='HeaderBackground');
backgroundSize: "100%";
}
</mx:Style>
<mx:Script>
<![CDATA[
 
/* import TiledHeaderSkins_fla.MainTimeline; */
 
//how far apart to place the stripes
private var span:int = 18;
 
//clear and add stripes on event resize
private function resizeHandler(ev:Event):void{
stripeHolder.removeAllChildren();
makeStripes();
}
 
//add strips until stripes width is equal to header width
private function makeStripes():void{
var stripeX:int = 0;
var barWidth:int = tiledBkg.width;
while(stripeX < barWidth){
var stripe:HeaderStripe = new HeaderStripe();
stripe.x = stripeX;
 
stripeHolder.addChild(stripe);
stripeX += span;
}
}
 
//set on resize event listener and add stripes
private function init():void
{
addEventListener(Event.RESIZE,resizeHandler);
makeStripes();
}
 
]]>
</mx:Script>
<mx:Canvas id="tiledBkg" width="100%" height="40" styleName="tiledBackground">
<mx:Canvas id="stripeHolder" width="100%" height="100%" horizontalScrollPolicy="off" verticalScrollPolicy="off" />
</mx:Canvas>
</mx:Application>

Download the source here.

You can find more information in the Flash CS4 reference guide.
http://help.adobe.com/en_US/Flash/10.0_UsingFlash/WSFD77A256-0DE1-46c7-86FB-CC4A8AE2EAA6.html
One of the greatest advantages of creating skins in Flash opposed to Illustrator or Photoshop is the amount of control over how the skin looks and functions. In Flash you can export all your skins as Flex components in a swc file which allows you to use those components as both classes or artwork. The flexibility comes in handy when building custom working/looking components. Button skins can be applied using the skin property with all of the states included in 1 skin class instead of four different images or symbols. You can even add transitional animations in between states.

The WorkWatcher Header:
We developed WorkWatcher, cost a business management AIR application, information pills in Flex with all the skins designed in Illustrator and Flash. One of the interesting skins is the header bar with the stripes also needed to be able to stretch. The stripes are added or removed as the header width changes without distortion, salve creating a true tiling effect.

For the header, we used 1(stripe) as a Flex component class and another as a background image with scale9grid turned applied. It took a couple tries to get things working purfectly, so the flexibility really helped and opened up possibilities that are not available to image files.


Note: Keeping your skins vector really has an advantage over bitmap skins, because of the way they work with the scale9grid. Scale9Grid works best in Flash with vector artwork, instead of bitmap. Even with scale9grid turned on in the MovieClip properties, the bitmap still stretches.

Flex Component Kit for Flash:
To get started using Flash to build Flex components you will need to download the Flex Component Kit for Flash and the Flex Skin Design Extensions. (login to Adobe labs required)
Once you have them installed, You will find a new menu item in the commands menu. Create all your skins or components as MovieClips, use the “Convert Symbol to Flex Component” menu command and publish.

You should also now have a Flex Skin Template that has all the major component skins. After publishing a new SWC file with be produced along with an swf(which we do not need). The SWC goes into the “libs” directory of your Flex project and the contained classes will be available for use in Flex. The hardest part is remembering the class names you made in Flash.

Using Flash Skins in Flex:
If you add a stop() action to a keyframe in Flash, you will be able to import the SWC similar to how you import any other class.

import TiledHeaderSkins_fla.MainTimeline;

If you have xmlns:local=”*” set in your applications properties, then the skinClasses will show up in Flex’s Class code complete list to declare variable types or mxml components. To use a skinComponent as a skin, you can apply them directly to the skin property in the mxml component or as a style.

Use for mxml Button:

<mx:Button id="myBtn" label="Press This" skin="{myBtnSkin}" />

Use as Style:

backgroundImage: Embed(skinClass='HeaderBackground');

The Striped Header Sample:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<mx:Application xmlns:mx="http://www.adobe.com/2006/mxml" layout="absolute" xmlns:local="*" creationComplete="init()">
<mx:Style>
.tiledBackground{
backgroundImage: Embed(skinClass='HeaderBackground');
backgroundSize: "100%";
}
</mx:Style>
<mx:Script>
<![CDATA[
 
/* import TiledHeaderSkins_fla.MainTimeline; */
 
//how far apart to place the stripes
private var span:int = 18;
 
//clear and add stripes on event resize
private function resizeHandler(ev:Event):void{
stripeHolder.removeAllChildren();
makeStripes();
}
 
//add strips until stripes width is equal to header width
private function makeStripes():void{
var stripeX:int = 0;
var barWidth:int = tiledBkg.width;
while(stripeX < barWidth){
var stripe:HeaderStripe = new HeaderStripe();
stripe.x = stripeX;
 
stripeHolder.addChild(stripe);
stripeX += span;
}
}
 
//set on resize event listener and add stripes
private function init():void
{
addEventListener(Event.RESIZE,resizeHandler);
makeStripes();
}
 
]]>
</mx:Script>
<mx:Canvas id="tiledBkg" width="100%" height="40" styleName="tiledBackground">
<mx:Canvas id="stripeHolder" width="100%" height="100%" horizontalScrollPolicy="off" verticalScrollPolicy="off" />
</mx:Canvas>
</mx:Application>

Download the source here.

You can find more information in the Flash CS4 reference guide.
http://help.adobe.com/en_US/Flash/10.0_UsingFlash/WSFD77A256-0DE1-46c7-86FB-CC4A8AE2EAA6.html
WorkWatcher is the application we use at HD Interactive to manage our business and virtual workforce. WorkWatcher will be completing beta very soon and we are offering a free 1 month subscription for a limited time. Anyone interested in giving WorkWatcher a try, drug to see if we can save your company and employees much time and money, capsule send an email to info@workwatcher.com today.

A Hosted Solution with an AIR Application Client:
We are web developers by day, this web but wanted to give WorkWatcher the feel of a desktop application. Something you keep open and use throughout the day, but still have the portability of a web application. Just download WorkWatcher to any computer and you can pick up where you left off.

WorkWatcher is a business management application, put together by people who have been managing development companies and developers for over 15 years. The application contains 11 tabs to manages things like Clients, Jobs, Team Members, Tasks, Hours, Payroll, and Profiles. Tabs are only visible to those with assigned privileges so this one application works for both Managers, Business Owners and Employees.

How it Works:
Functionality is pretty simple, enter clients and jobs associated to each client, then assign team members to those jobs. Members are now able to enter hours and give comments throughout the life of each job. Mangers and business owners can now watch progress, manage budgets and assign tasks. We are a virtual company and have build WorkWatcher to manager our business as well as other service related companies that want to spend less time tracking worker/project progress and more time growing your business.

Our Sales Pitch is This:
If you spend more than a few hours a month updating spreadsheets and calculating budget hours, WorkWatcher easily pays for itself. WorkWatcher helps you find lost revenue and billing opportunities, by showing all hours worked, even those that often get forgotten.

WorkWatcher also includes a mobile interface, charts and for those who are really partial to spreadsheets, we have those too.

If you would like to try WorkWatcher for 1 month free and help us finalize all the features that will be in the final 1.0 release, send us an email at info@workwatcher.com

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