Everything You Need To Know About CSS Margins

Everything You Need To Know About CSS Margins Everything You Need To Know About CSS Margins Rachel Andrew 2019-07-15T12:30:59+02:002019-07-15T11:04:38+00:00 One of the first things most of us learned when we learned CSS, was details of the various parts of a box in CSS, described as The CSS Box Model. One of the elements in the Box Model is the margin, a transparent area around a box, which will push other elements away from the box contents. The margin-top, margin-right, margin-bottom and margin-left properties were described right back in CSS1, along with the shorthand margin for setting all four properties at once. A margin seems to be a fairly uncomplicated thing, however, in this article, we will take a look at some of the things which trip people up with regard to using margins. In particular, we will be looking at how margins interact with each other, and how margin collapsing Read the full article…

Prioritizing Design Critique, Part 1

By Jonathan Walter If you’ve worked in enterprise environments with a scarcity of UX resources, you already know how difficult it is to institute design processes whose goal is to improve your craft and the quality of your design deliverables. At companies that allocate insufficient funds and support to User Experience, there is often limited opportunity for activities beyond approved, budgeted project work. Moreover, building additional commitments into your schedule can be exhausting when there are already several, disparate product teams awaiting your and your teammates’ design deliverables. Activities that focus on collaboration with UX teammates and craft are usually the first to fall by the wayside. However, making the time for UX teammates to come together and focus on our craft and the quality of our deliverables benefits not only us, but the entire company—especially the product teams with whom we work. Doing so helps prevent inconsistent designs, the Read the full article…

Project Estimation, Part 4: Leveraging Design Thinking to Drive Higher Quality

By Leo Frishberg One of the greatest challenges of running a service business is balancing your labor costs against clients’ true needs. Addressing a complex business problem can require significantly more resources than addressing a simple one. Complex problems often require more time, higher-paid employees, or both. Complicating matters further, clients want to know how much to budget and the extent to which that budget will be accurate throughout the course of a project. But complex projects, by their nature, are extremely difficult to predict up front. Of course, clients want to get the most value for their money, so they’ll want to reduce costs whenever possible, making estimating even more challenging. When you put all these challenges together, it’s not too surprising to see service projects failing to meet client expectations, running over budget, or delivering outcomes of far lower value than anyone had hoped. While the approach to Read the full article…

Creating Effective Carousels

By Steven Hoober One of the most prevalent user interactions is scrolling. For mobile devices, with their small screens and direct, gestural interactions, scrolling is even more important than for desktop applications. But we don’t generally even refer to vertical scrolling because pages in apps and Web sites typically default to vertical scrolling. Today, most of us have grown up reading content—whether in print or online—so scrolling vertically is simply what works best for people. When designing for content, it is important to remember that people do not always do things the same way. They consume text, grids, or lists not just by reading each item, but very often by scanning. People’s eyes jump from one section to the next, often reading just the first few characters of each line. If you organize content oddly or incorrectly, users might miss a huge amount of what you’re trying to show them. Read the full article…